Importing many samples into Sampler: File names matter.

You can import a whole bunch of samples into Sampler and have them mapped automatically by Drambo.

The audio content doesn't matter, the mapping will only be done based on the file names.

The file naming scheme looks like this:

{SampleName}_{NoteNameOr3digitNoteNumber}_{3digitVelocity}.fileextension

Make sure the names remain unambiguous. That includes avoiding numbers in the first part of the file name.

Comments

  • So like this?

    Guitarette_C2_096.wav

    or

    Guitarette_048_096.wav

  • How about velocity layering?


  • The available velocity range of 1..127 is divided into 4 velocity windows (seems like the lowest goes from 1..47 but only giku can tell the exact ranges) and the velocity given in the file name will be put into the appropriate velocity window. If there's less than 4 samples at the same key, the velocity range will be stretched to fill the whole velocity range.

  • Cheers @rs2000 i now see I’ve missed the velocity number in your op

  • @rs2000 - just checking whether this is valid for the App Store version or the beta only? Some time back (but on the current version I think) it seemed like there were problems we failed to sort out.

    I guess I could just try, but would rather not waste the time if I this is only working in the beta version.

  • edited February 28

    OK so this works in both the Appstore and the current beta version:

    Filename_Notenumber_Velocity.wav

    The file name shouldn't contain numbers.

    The velocity number is only evaluated for sorting the samples by their velocity levels and the absolute number doesn't really matter, the highest number will always be on top and the lowest number will always be at the bottom.

    When mapped, the MIDI velocity windows are:

    0-31

    32-63

    64-95

    96-127


    Another nice trick to know is that the Sampler also reads m4a compressed audio files. Compressing to 128..160kbit is usually good enough, helping to dramatically reduce the instrument size on disk.

    Note though that the files have to be decompressed into RAM when loading so they'll still require the pcm (uncompressed) equivalent amount of sample RAM.

    Enjoy!

  • Thanks @rs2000 ... long-time mystery solved. I'm going to give it a shot.

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